You're Married, Now What?

What to do after your special day

Apply for your marriage license

Your Celebrant is responsible for filing the appropriate paperwork and registering your marriage with the Australian Births, Deaths and Marriages Office. You do not automatically receive a standard marriage certificate (i.e. the official certificate that looks like your Australian Birth Certificate) after getting married. You need to apply and pay a fee.

Learn how to apply for a standard marriage certificate.

Processing your marriage registration and certificate application forms can take up to 5 business days. If you apply for the certificate before your marriage is registered, we will post the certificate when it is ready.

Legally change your name

If you're planning to, that is! Changing your name on Facebook and Twitter is the easy part, but you also need to make time to do it legally. You will need your ID documents (Birth Certificates, Drivers Licence, Passport, etc.), and the official marriage certificate mentioned above.

A few places to start:

  • Driver’s licence
  • Passport
  • Medicare
  • My Gov
  • ATO
  • Doctor’s Office / Medical Records
  • Your work
  • Your local Council
  • Private Health Insurance

Tell your employer

Further to the above tips, and whether you choose to change your name or not, you should still let the human resources department at your employer know that you’re married—definitely one of the most important things to do after getting married. Changes will likely need to be made to your tax information and documents, and potentially your health insurance, among others.

Write thank-you notes

You probably received gifts at and after your wedding, so don’t forget to say thank-you! Writing a few thank-you notes per day isn’t too much of a burden, but will ensure that you don’t get behind an end up with an overwhelming pile of unwritten notes.

Review your vendors

Your wedding vendors worked tirelessly to make your day feel so magical and special. Consider returning the favour by posting a great review on their social media page or their website. It's a great way to express your gratitude and help your vendors grow their business. And don't just do it for them — do it so other couples can discover your amazing makeup artist or fabulous florist.

Freeze your cake

Saving the top tier of your wedding cake to eat on your first anniversary is a fun thing to do after getting married—and a one of the very best excuses to eat cake! To ensure that your cake is in edible condition a year from now, ask a friend, family member, or wedding party member to be in charge of retrieving the top tier of the cake, and if you won’t be around, ask them to start the freezing process for you. When you return, simply move it to your own freezer.

Preserve your attire

I did not do this, and I regret it. Seriously. No matter what you wore to your wedding, it’s a good idea to have your attire cleaned as soon as possible after the big day so that any dirt or stains don’t set in. If you’re headed on your honeymoon immediately after your wedding, you can enlist a family member or friend to drop off your attire to the cleaners. It can take many weeks to properly clean and preserve a wedding dress, so it’s best to get the process started sooner rather than later.

Do something with all your wedding décor

There are a lot of little things that come together to make your big day look possible, but after you tie the knot, what are you supposed to do with them? If you find that 15 glitter-covered Mason jars and 25 vintage suitcases are making themselves comfortable in your guest bedroom, do yourself a favour and find them a new home. You could sell the items to other couples planning a wedding (try eBay, Buy Swap and Sell, or just post a note about the items you want to unload on Facebook), put together a garage sale, find a way to work them into your home décor, donate them or, at the very least, toss them. You'll feel relieved once you've de-cluttered, I promise.

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ROSSELA RE1-01-min
Copyright © Rosella Celebrant

Authorised Marriage Celebrant, Civil Ceremonies
Australian Government - Attorney General's Department

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